Midge Ure talks about Kate’s ‘Sister and Brother’ vocals

Midge Ure and Kate 1982

In the January 2019 edition of Classic Pop (out now – see their site here for details), Scottish singer Midge Ure was asked about the time Kate recorded backing vocals on his 1988 track, Sister and Brother. In 1982, Midge had appeared on stage with Kate Bush – along with Pete Townsend, Mick Karn and Phil Collins – while she performed The Wedding List live on stage during the Prince’s Trust Rock Gala.

Classic Pop January 2019“Midge’s first solo album after leaving Ultravox, Answers To Nothing, features a major coup – a rare guest vocal by Kate Bush, who sings as the sister in Sister and Brother. After Midge’s approach, Bush said she’d send a vocal contribution back if she had time. At that point, she was in the middle of recording her album The Sensual World. ”I wasn’t expecting Kate to do anything at all, or that she’d take months if she could help,” Midge admits, ”Then she phoned up a week later and said: ‘I’ve done something, do you want to come to my studio to hear it?”

Having turned her vocals around so quickly, Midge was ready for Bush’s contribution to be two or three lines; probably her sister character answering the brother’s questions. Instead, Bush had multi-tracked the vocals with effects Midge calls: “all these wonderful Kateisms”, including a choral section at the end of the song.

‘It was glorious,” enthuses Midge. ”My only regret is that I didn’t see Kate at work to see how she’d done it. Hearing someone like Kate Bush pour their heart and soul into one of my songs was an incredible affirmation. It was, ’Well done you, we’re giving you a gold star for your essay.’ I was shocked she’d taken so much time and effort.”

Having that mutual respect from someone so highly regarded helped convince Midge he was following the right path. He says: ”I realised I didn’t have to be aiming for three-minute pop songs, that I could make pieces of music I love, even if nobody else gets it.” [You can subscribe to Classic Pop here]

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Kate posts a Clarification post on her site addressing “Tory” rumours

Kate in 2014

It’s been VERY difficult to bite my lip on the news site about this for over two years, but Kate has this evening finally, very publicly and definitively rebuked an insidious story, continually propagated on social media and in the press since 2016, about her supposed political leanings. Here’s Kate’s clarification:

Clarification

It’s been very exciting to hear all the positive feedback around the Remastered project and the lyric book. Thank you so much for embracing both of them. It means a great deal to everyone involved.
       I didn’t do any interviews for either project hoping that the work could speak for itself. I read some articles that included a number of inaccuracies and usually I don’t respond. However I do feel I need to address one story which came from a phone interview I did two years ago. I was very disappointed that the use of a quote out of context was timed with the release of the live album and it seemed as if the focus went onto the quote rather than the work. It was deeply frustrating. At the time I discussed the idea of responding to it with close friends and we all agreed it was best to let it go. It seems the quote keeps being used and so I’d like to present my side of the story. Over the years, I have avoided making political comments in interviews. My response to the interviewer was not meant to be political but rather was in the defence of women in power. I felt he was putting a really negative slant on powerful women, referring to a witch hunt involving Hilary Clinton. In response I said that we had a woman in charge of our country, and that I felt it was a good thing to have women in power. I should have been clearer when I then said it was the best thing that had happened to us for a long time – because I greatly disliked the behaviour of the previous PM, who at that point I felt had abandoned us and everybody felt angry and let down. 
     Again with no response from me to the latest resurfacing of this article, it could make it seem like I am a tory supporter which I want to make clear I am not.
          I won’t be commenting further on this, but feel it’s become so pervasive that I felt I needed to clarify this matter once and for all.
  Happy New Year,
          Kate

Media Coverage: BBC | The Guardian | The Irish Times | RTE | Sky News | Daily Mail | Politico | PitchforkThe Independent | Indy100 | The Guardian (analysis piece)

I wanted to bring this to as many people’s attention as possible, so I put together a brief mini episode of the Kate Bush Fan Podcast to do just that!

You can subscribe to the Kate Bush Fan Podcast on iTunes or on any podcast app you happen to use, such as Stitcher or Tunein or listen below on Soundcloud.

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More reviews for Kate Bush Remastered and How To Be Invisible!

Kate Bush Remastered CD Box 1The January 2019 edition of Classic Pop magazine (out now) has ranked the Kate Bush Remastered Part 1 CD Box as the 3rd best reissue of 2018: “The end of the year saw a tremendous reissue of Kate Bush’s back catalogue in its entirety and here was the pick, collecting her albums from 1978’s The Kick Inside to 1993’s The Red Shoes. Fifteen years of insatiable, mystical folk-pop from this most quixotic of artists – here was a dreaming indeed.”  

Meanwhile Billboard Magazine has included Kate’s Remastered box sets in their Top Ten of the best reissues of 2018. Ron Hart writes: “By pop parameters, remastering the catalog of Kate Bush is like trying to do a restoration on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel — how do you improve upon perfection? But across these two extraordinary box sets, the British visionary’s recorded output has never looked or sounded better, while a four-disc collection of extras — though in many ways incomplete with the absence of such crucial fan favorites as the 12-inch mixes from her The Red Shoes era and the material comprising the 1979 On Stage EP — is nevertheless a treasure trove filled with such rare treats as the previously unreleased 1975 composition “Humming” and a version of Marvin Gaye’s “Sexual Healing” that was originally recorded in 1994 with Irish musician Davy Spillane and wasn’t officially released until 2005 when it served as the b-side for the Aerial single “King of the Mountain.”

Kate Bush Remastered Part 2

Australian site, Your Music Radar, has a great article on the remasters here by Brian Parker. Brian says: “Kate has continued to make brilliant, inspiring albums, and has recently remastered all her back catalogue on her own record label, Fish People. For a woman that has always seemed reluctant to look back, the remastering of all her albums was long overdue. How can you make perfection, sound more perfect? And the result? It’s a sonic dream. Rather than making the tracks louder, Kate (with James Guthrie) has focussed on clarity, making the albums sound more crisp. Little subtleties like harder sounding drums, clearer backing vocals, crisper synth motifs. It feels as if a fresh breath of air has been injected into the albums, making them sound more vibrant, colourful, and breathing life into all her vignettes abundant from her imaginative mind.

Both the CDs and vinyls are lavishly packaged. They can either be purchased individually, or in four vinyl and two CD boxsets. She has pulled together b-sides, 12″ mixes and some other rarities as well (including a song called ‘Humming’ that has never been released in any format, which was recorded from the same early sessions as ‘The Man With The Child In His Eyes’). For some reason she has emitted the Kate Bush on Stage EP (which contained tracks from her first 1979 tour), and the amazing b-side from ‘The Big Sky’ called ‘Not This Time’ – okay these are only tiny gripes. The thing is the remastered albums serve a reminder of what a singular and extraordinary talent she is – a testament to artists not to compromise, stay true to your muse, whilst at the same time valuing your privacy and giving the corporate-ness of the music industry a two fingered salute. She did it her way.”

Stuart MaconieWell-known UK music journalist and BBC 6Music presenter, Stuart Maconie, has often reviewed Kate’s work over the years, and in his recent column in the Waitrose Weekend UK free newspaper he doesn’t hold back in his praise:          

“As a creator, Kate Bush is as monumental as the Great Pyramid makers and the results are just as awe-inspiring and enduring. Because Kate doesn’t like to rush things, her albums come around at intervals roughly between the Football World Cup and the appearance of Halley’s Comet. This means that its possible to chart one’s life alongside them. I certainly can. I was a music-drunk teenager when I first saw and heard her at the time of Wuthering Heights and The Kick Inside and was instantly besotted. By Hounds Of Love, I was floundering on the dole in Essex and Wigan. The Red Shoes found me actually with her in a studio in North London, chatting about it for a music magazine, my fortunes having changed somewhat. T S Eliot’s Prufrock measured out his life in coffee spoons, I’ve done it with Kate Bush albums.

If you’ve had a similar life with Kate, and if your original vinyl and CDs are getting a little battered, you’ll probably be drooling over a new and highly desirable boxset just released in time for Christmas; Kate Bush Remastered…..conventional critical wisdom has it that the early records, uniquely strange and delicious, like Wuthering Heights, were a kind of gauche apprenticeship for the mature works that came along at much longer intervals and framed in state-of-the-art studio production architecture, albums like Aerial and The Sensual World. For me, it’s the early work here that delights; direct, pure, slightly odd. These are pop songs but filtered and fractured through her uncommon sensibilities. Moving, Delius, Oh England My Lionheart, these are songs utterly unlike what anyone else was doing at the time (although they spawned legions of imitators). Sometimes, as in the case of Them Heavy People or Hammer Horror they are geekily funny, sometimes eerie (The Kick Inside, Wow), elsewhere (In The Warm Room, Feel It) disarmingly, shockingly sexy. Whichever period Kate is your favourite, they’re all here. It’s not cheap. But it’s a very special body of work, unlike anything else in British pop….Wow, as she once sang. unbelievable.”

The Guardian has reviewed Kate’s new book of lyrics, How To Be Invisible. Laura Snapes grapples with understanding Kate through her lyrics, without annotation from Kate herself:

“This understanding (of gender and power) is one thread of How to Be Invisible, which splits selections from her catalogue across 10 newly curated sections, offering no clear framing devices. (Only Aerial’s A Sky of Honey suite and Hounds of Love’s second side, The Ninth Wave, remain intact.) Here is how we might find her, wedding Snowflake and Hounds of Love into a consideration of the perils of succumbing to love; contemplating alchemy and evolution from Cloudbusting, about a child losing faith in a parent, to Bertie, a tribute to how her son transformed her life.

She addresses loss movingly: Aerial’s A Coral Room finds the memory of her late mother in “her little brown jug”; The Fog, from The Sensual World, asks how to love when its objects are transient. Houdini and Get Out of My House bookend her strident interrogation in how to remain open to pleasure but protected from deception. Two sections dwell on gender. Joanni, her portrait of Joan of Arc, is juxtaposed with an indictment of masculine warmongering (Army Dreamers). Later, Bush explores masculine and feminine perspectives, contemplating desire (Reaching Out) and obligation (Night of the Swallow), never reaching trite conclusions.

If there is one to be drawn from How to Be Invisible, it isn’t that Bush is unknowable, but that life is: how much can we ever know about love, ourselves, the things we lose? She is never cowed by the uncertainty. Her songwriting suggests the only way to weather it is with curiosity; applying silliness as courageously as literary seriousness, balancing spiritual insight alongside unabashed carnality, domestic truth alongside fantasy, never concerned by contradictions. Desire runs wild in the final section: Mrs Bartolozzi’s sexual laundry fantasia; the wily, windy Wuthering Heights. This headstrong pursuit has guided Bush. The question is not what we can learn about her, but what we might learn from following her lead.”

A review piece in the New Statesman, “When Song Lyrics Become Literature”, explores four recent lyrics books by musical artists, including Neil Tennant (Pet Shop Boys), Florence Welch and the late Leonard Cohen. The writer, Jude Rogers, reserves particular high praise for Kate’s How To Be Invisible:  

How To Be Invisible“Her book, unlike Tennant’s, works magically, possibly because many of her lyrics are structured so strangely. She also adds, in her brief author’s note: “all the lyrics have been reviewed as works of verse without their music and so in some places are more detailed than how they originally appeared on their albums”. Some digging on my part reveals nothing more than her playing with poetical constructions such as “o’er”. To do this job properly, however, weeks of album listening will be required, promoting a deeper understanding of these songs. Bush clearly knows what she’s doing.

How To Be Invisible also sees Bush grouping her songs, without explaining her methods; it’s your job to spot the golden threads connecting these pages. Here are songs about clouds (“Cloudbusting”, “The Big Sky”, “You Want Alchemy”), drifting in and out with wonder. Here are songs explicitly and obliquely about war (“Pull Out the Pin”, “Breathing”, “Experiment IV”). “Army Dreamers” is also in this set, one of many that reads astonishingly on paper. A number 16 hit in 1980, its lyric about a dead soldier reminds you of the brutal economy of Sylvia Plath: “Now he’s sitting in his hole,” runs the most devastating line. “He might as well have buttons and bows.”

Themes recur at mystical intervals too. The rope that ties lovers together in “Sat In Your Lap” appears, like a ghost, in “Snowed In At Wheeler Street” (songs from 1981 and 2011 respectively; their dates are not listed in the book). The second-side song cycles from Hounds of Love (1985) and Aerial (2005) – “The Ninth Wave” and “A Sky of Honey” respectively – also incorporate pages that go beyond conventional text (the voices murmuring to the drowning woman in “The Ninth Wave” dance across a double-page spread in different typefaces; while in “A Sky of Honey” birdsong is depicted in skittish, angled handwriting). Here is an artist still expanding the possibilities of a form, as she always has.”

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Kate writes to fans on New Year’s Day

Kate Bush Remastered

Happy New Year! On her official site, Kate has written an update thanking fans for their generous support of the Kate Bush Remastered Pop Up in December. She writes: 

We will be announcing the total amount that has been raised for Crisis as soon as all the accounting is complete. It looks like this will be towards the end of January. Thank you again for all your generous support.
       Wishing you all a very happy new year.
             Kate

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Kate Bush Fan Podcast Christmas special episode is here!

Happy Christmas! Seán introduces our Christmas Special episode for 2018 hosted by Bush Telegraph – Paul Thomas and Darrell Babidge! Darrell and Paul talk in depth about the Christmas Kate Show from 1979, and other festive things related to Kate. This includes the Christmas Kate Bush Club Newsletters, the recent Pop Up Shop in London, another Christmas TV appearance in 1979, and the release of ‘December Will Be Magic Again’ in 1980. Thanks for listening in 2018! We’ll be back in 2019!

You can subscribe to the Kate Bush Fan Podcast on iTunes or on any podcast app you happen to use, such as Stitcher or Tunein or listen below on Soundcloud.

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New Yorker Magazine on Kate Bush Remastered: “Enduring, Incandescent Power”

New Yorker article

In a high profile review in The New Yorker, Margaret Talbot luxuriates in re-discovering Kate’s work through listening to the Remastered box sets. Wonderfully titled “The Enduring, Incandescent Power of Kate Bush“, the article finds the writer spending “most of a week last month in a Kate Bush-induced reverie—or was it a swoon? I know there were tears: you try remaining dry-eyed listening to “This Woman’s Work” on a cold November night after a glass or two of wine; if you do, I don’t want to know you. There may have been some ecstatic dancing that alarmed the dog; there was definitely some animated texting of lyrics to my children, who, at twenty-two and nineteen are both, bless them, Kate Bush fans…..listening to all the tracks on a complete boxed set is like going to a party and talking to all the strangers you’d normally avoid instead of the friends you already have.”

Talbot concludes this excellent, lengthy piece by summarising Kate through a Virginia Woolf quote (written about Emily Brontë): “Hers then is the rarest of all powers, she could free life from its dependence on facts, with a few touches indicate the spirit of a face so that it needs no body; by speaking of the moor make the wind blow and the thunder roar.” Read the full article at The New Yorker site here

You can buy Kate’s Remastered box sets, her How To Be Invisible book of lyrics and also t-shirts and lots of other new items at the online version of Kate’s Remastered Pop-Up Shop, all profits to the Crisis homelessness charity right up till January 1st. Click here for the online Pop-Up Shop.

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New Podcast Episode – Collectors special from London Pop-Up with Monty!

Merchandise from the Kate Bush Pop-Up

Picture 1 of 28

In this episode of the Kate Bush Fan Podcast, Seán heads to London to experience the extraordinary 5-day Kate Bush Remastered Pop-Up for himself. After meeting the HomeGround gang (and a certain actor friend of theirs!) he brings his swag with him to meet Monty Moncrieff MBE.

Monty is a Kate Bush superfan and we get into the world of collecting Kate Bush; vinyl records, box sets, rarities and even fakes – we cover it all. It’s very geeky, so be warned, but we had fun doing it. We also feature a fantastic version of one of Kate’s songs by our friend Tristan! Long episode, this one! Be sure to check out the image gallery above for photos of some of the things we discuss. 

You can subscribe to the Kate Bush Fan Podcast on iTunes or on any podcast app you happen to use, such as Stitcher or Tunein or listen below on Soundcloud.

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The Irish Times review Kate’s new book: “Not a spare word anywhere”

John BoyneJohn Boyne, bestselling author of The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas, writes in The Irish Times about his discovery that reading the lyrics in Kate’s new book, How To Be Invisible, is to experience her songs in an entirely new way. He writes:

“Knowing the albums as well as I do, reading these familiar lyrics is to experience the songs I love in an entirely new way. They’re not structured chronologically here, and there’s more focus on the later work than the earlier, but this adds an interesting element, for Bush has clearly chosen each juxtaposition for a reason. Breathing, for example, a song about nuclear war, is placed next to Experiment IV, which recounts a military plot to create “a sound that could kill someone from a distance”, and this is followed by Joanni, a song about Joan of Arc. The entire section is introduced by the classic Army Dreamers and ends with O England My Lionheart, where “the soldiers soften, the war is over, the air raid shelters are blooming clover”. And these five songs are drawn from four different albums. It’s so subtle, but it’s so smart.” Read the full review here.

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Kate Bush Remastered Pop-Up goes online tomorrow!

Pop-Up online

Kate writes on her official site:

“We have had an overwhelming response to the pop-up shop. Thank you so much for all your incredible support. It’s been an exciting experience!  We’ve had a great number of people asking for the opportunity to buy the items from an on-line shop, so we have been working on this and we are delighted to announce that the on-line shop will be open here on Monday, 10th December at 12.30pm (GMT).

All profits from this on-line shop will be going to the charity Crisis until 1st January 2019.

In early January, we will be announcing the amount you have kindly donated to Crisis by taking part in this pop-up event. You have been so extremely generous and have helped to make it a happier time for homeless people this Christmas.

I would especially like to thank the following people who have made a huge contribution to the project:

David Bell and FIREBRAND
Dan Chalmers at WMG
Lee Brackstone at Faber and Faber
Murray Chalmers and MCPR
David Munns
Geoff Jukes
Stuart Crouch
Neil and Selina
Craig White
David Crofts
Pat Savage
Simon Moran
Lucie Balcombe
Tom Gallacher
Lee Gregory
Tanya Davies
Eve Gee
Jordan Gaster
Hannah Gaster
Millie Davies
Ferdinand Van Heerdan
Alexandra Moisey
Raymond Bell
James Bowthorpe
Matt O’Neill
Adam Mallett
Nick Taylor
Aidan Gooding Donoghue
Megane Grimonster

Many, many thanks again and wishing you all a wonderful Christmas and a very Happy New Year ahead.
Kate”

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Author David Mitchell writes in today’s Guardian about Kate’s work!

As well as appearing on this morning’s Today programme on BBC Radio 4 (see our earlier news item with transcript here), novelist David Mitchell writes a lengthy and quite brilliant piece in today’s Guardian. For him, she has produced four album masterpieces in her career – guess which ones? Read the full article here. Here’s an excerpt in which he discusses what it means to be a fan of Kate’s work:

“I’ve been a fan of Kate Bush for nearly 40 years. Being a fan, like being in love, is giddying, it’s as personal as skin, it connects you with others in a particular way, and it sets you up for a fall. Being a fan puts you on one-way first name terms with the object of your fan-ness, even if he, she, they or “Kate” don’t know you exist – as is almost always the case. Over time, the “fan state” may change in expression but not in essence. “Fan” as a label is a slur on your critical objectivity and even your maturity, but if you weren’t a fan of something or someone, wouldn’t life be a little bland?

You don’t learn much about Kate Bush from her songs. She’s fond of masks and costumes – lyrically and literally – and of yarns, fabulations and atypical narrative viewpoints. Yet, these fiercely singular pieces, which nobody else could have authored, are also maps of the heart, the psyche, the imagination. In other words, art.”

“Fans want more of what we loved the first time, yet we complain if things feel repetitive. Kate is a mighty exception to all this, as rare as a yeti. Her fidelity to her ever-curious, ever-morphing muse has won her a body of fans who hold her songs as treasured possessions to be carried through life. By dint of never having been in fashion, she has never fallen out of fashion. By taking bold artistic risks that she navigates with ingenuity and wisely chosen collaborators, the albums Kate made in her late 40s and 50s equal and surpass the songs recorded in her teens and 20s that made her famous. To any artist in any field, her example is a hope-instilling exhortation to evolve, to reinvent, to reimagine what we do.”

You can buy Kate’s book (with exclusive bookmark), and also How To Be Invisible t-shirts and tote bags along with lots of other items, AND enter a raffle for a signed copy at the Kate Bush Remastered Pop Up in Coal Drops Yard, London, which is still open every day until Sunday December 9th at 8pm, all profits to the Crisis homelessness charity. More info here

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Author David Mitchell talks about Kate’s book on BBC Radio 4

On the Today programme this morning on BBC Radio 4, author David Mitchell talks to Rebecca Jones about Kate’s book of lyrics, How To Be Invisible, for which he wrote the introduction. David previously worked with Kate on dialogue for scenes in her Before the Dawn shows. David has previously written about his love of Kate’s work in The Guardian here. Listen to the interview with David at time mark 2:22:37 into this audio stream here.

“I’m just really, really glad that this woman exists, I’m so glad she’s made the music she has done. It’s like a constellation in the sky for me, it fills me with wonder. As I’ve evolved her songs have a quality – they evolve as well. I often sort of think of them as companions who walk with me through life.”

She is notoriously private. What can we learn about Kate Bush through her lyrics?

“She is a “word nerd”…the kooky, quirky, quixotic use of language. She’s not afraid of the darker places of the human psyche. That gives her work power that most songs don’t even aspire to.

How did you first come across her? 

“Well, I first encountered Kate Bush like many people of my generation in 1978 on Top of the Pops when the video for Wuthering Heights appeared…(laughing) it was like nothing we’d ever seen before. I remember the next day I went to school and all the girls in the class were playing being “Kate Bush”, doing that dance around the playground which certainly burnt that song into my memory…and it’s still there.”

On Kate’s influence on his own writing: “She had an album in 1982 called The Dreaming which was artistically experimental, and it is a risk-encourager, you can’t listen to it without thinking, well, if it worked for her, maybe it will work for me as well. I listened to that album over and over and over when I was writing my first two novels. It’s a sort of friendly artistic muse on your ear saying: “yeah go on, have a go, try it, see if it works”

It was while he was working on his new novel that the request came from Kate Bush to write the introduction to her new book. We’re often advised not to meet our heroes, because they might be disappointing, what was it like for you then?  

“She’s not at all disappointing; she’s like her songs, she has a deep mind, the size of a planet, it’s full of interesting thoughts and images and combinations of words that you haven’t really met before, and just a very warm human being as well.”

Is there any hint that she’s working on new music? David, amused (and cautious!) says: “I’m not allowed to say, I’m SO not allowed to say…I can neither confirm nor deny so I’ll just have to lapse into enigmatic silence I’m afraid!” David concludes the interview, summing up Kate’s influence: “People will still be listening to these songs with amazement in two, three hundred years time. I think this work will last in the same way that metaphysical poetry from the Elizabethan era has lasted. I know that’s a huge claim to be making, but if I were to to make it about anyone, then Kate Bush would be in that very small circle of artists.”

You can buy Kate’s book (with exclusive bookmark), and also How To Be Invisible t-shirts and tote bags along with lots of other items, AND enter a raffle for a signed copy at the Kate Bush Remastered Pop Up in Coal Drops Yard, London, which is still open every day until Sunday December 9th at 8pm, all profits to the Crisis homelessness charity. More info here

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How To Be Invisible, Kate’s book of lyrics, released today!

Kate’s book of lyrics, How To Be Invisible is published today! After escaping into branches of Waterstones a little early last weekend, it will now be available in all good bookshops priced £14.99. We hope you enjoy curling up by the fire this December, mug of cocoa or a nice glass of red in hand, pouring over and savouring the results of Kate’s decades as a wordsmith like no other, selected and arranged by her, with an introduction by her friend, novelist David Mitchell. How lovely. (You’re going to love Aerial Tal!)

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Kate’s charity Pop Up Shop opens to queues of fans in London!

Some photos from this morning’s opening at 10am of the Kate Bush Remastered Pop Up in Coal Drops Yard, London! An actual Kate Bush shop exists on the planet! Well, for 5 days anyway. Try to get down there, pick up your Kate Bush swag and help raise funds for the homelessness charity, Crisis!

From what we hear there’s a whole NEW range of Kate Bush Remastered merchandise, with imagery from different albums, including (deep breath): T-Shirts at £25 each – including How To Be Invisible (book logo), The Kate Bush Remastered logo (with an Aerial-esque soundwave made up of all of Kate’s song titles – it’s gorgeous!), The Red Shoes t-shirt, The Sensual World t-shirt, Never For Ever t-shirt. There’s a set of 4 coasters with Fish People vinyl labels on them for £12, a set of 4 badges for £10,  gorgeous mugs are £10 each, including a stunning Never For Ever mug, a Fish People mug and a Red Shoes mug. Also on sale are 50 Words For Snow Christmas Cards, 50 Words For Snow AND December Will Be Magic Again Christmas Tree Baubles which are £20 each, PLUS posters, hoodies, remastered vinyl, remastered CDs, Kate’s How To Be Invisible book (with limited edition bookmark), and various limited prints on display to tie in with Kate Bush Remastered! Phew. Get down there!!

Daily raffle prizes include: 10 x How to Be Invisible regular edition books, signed by Kate, 10 x Calligraphic 50 Words For Snow art prints, signed by Kate, 4 x King of the Mountain picture discs (unsigned) and 16 x Running Up That Hill RSD picture discs (unsigned). This presentation print below is available to buy, for €7,000!

Signed BTD sold out poster

More details on the pop up, including location and opening times, here.

Your swag comes in a bag!

Day 1 open

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The Irish Times on Kate’s literary inspirations as her book is released

Irish Times

Patrick Kelleher writes today in The Irish Times about Kate’s literary inspirations across her body of work:

“Wuthering Heights was just the beginning of a career that has been filled with literary influences. As Bush prepares this week to release a book of lyrics, called How To Be Invisible, now is a fitting time to reflect on the songs throughout her illustrious career that have been influenced by literature….” Emily Brontë, Peter Pan, Shakespeare, Henry James, Stephen King, Peter Reich, Alfred Tennyson, James Joyce and Hans Christian Andersen are all discussed.  Kelleher concludes:  “As Bush prepares to release a book of lyrics, and has just released remastered versions of all of her albums on CD and vinyl for the first time, there could be more literary-inspired Bush music on the horizon.” Read the full article here.

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Have you spotted the latest hidden KT symbols on Kate Bush Remastered?

Well, it wouldn’t be a new Kate Bush release without hidden KT symbols, would it? These remasters are the gift that keep giving!

In Others Words KT Symbol

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