The latest news about the musician Kate Bush and her work

Mistraldespair stop motion film segment to premiere on Kate’s site tonight!

Kate is premièring the second of three film segments from her new album at 7.30pm GMT at her official site. This is the first time that Kate has directed a stop-motion film. The film is titled ‘Mistraldespair‘ and she writes about the people and process behind the film at her site here. Each of the three films last about 2 and half minutes. We have already seen the film for Wild Man. Mistraldespair features part of the epic song, Misty. Enjoy!

[youtube width=”640″ height=”360″]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5JoPFIWOONU[/youtube]

From Kate… I am delighted to announce the premiere of “Mistraldespair”, the 2nd visual piece. This accompanies a segment from the track ‘Misty’. It has been a very intense journey but I am really happy with the end result. It is a 2 and a half minute stop motion animation.

It has been created by the extremely talented Tommy Thompson. He has worked so hard and devotedly. Fantastic job!

As I’m sure you are aware, stop frame animation is a truly painstaking process, one that I feel has a purity and incredible beauty because of its organic nature.  I wanted to try and achieve something quite adult that involved a slow, sensual feel. Not something you often see in the usually more slap-stick approach to this medium.

There are some people I want to thank:  Andre Masters who created the lovely female puppet, Gary Cureton for his animation, Ben Perrot and Matt Curtis for their wonderful post production work, Paul Matchliss, Ben Cote, Hazel Pethig, Juan Carlos and Foad Shah.  Adam, Emily, the two Robs and Patrick at Deluxe.  Special thanks to Bertie and Dan.

I want to especially thank Mike Solinger, a brilliant producer and a total joy to work with.

I have never directed a stop motion animation before. It has been a fascinating and very rewarding experience.

Tommy Thompson is going to be a huge star!

I hope you like it.
Kate

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10 Comments

  1. Avatar

    Deliciously creepy!

  2. Avatar

    Another Swede

    I rather connect this song with unhappy love because its so beautiful., This was not my cup of tea at all, ………But still adore you Kate

  3. Avatar

    J.

    I AM loving this new, un-rushed approach Kate et al are taking with these short animations (Mistral-, Wild-), they are NOT promos – just appetizers or enhancements to the immersive world KB gently invites us all into, inclusively.
    Whilst giving us plenty of room to fill in the rest of the tracks with our OWN imaginations.
    Bravo !
    (Looking forward to the next installment)

  4. Avatar

    giulio

    This animated motion picture’s absolutely brilliant and perfect
    to accompany this 2.25 edit, which – to my ears –
    sounds even more touching and ”essence” than the longer
    album version. This goes right to my heart.
    Fantastic Kate Bush

  5. Avatar

    Wonderful animation which I find almost unbearably painful to watch. The way he cries and begins to melt…leaving her totally alone.
    I know it’s not “real”..but oh dear, upsetting! 🙁

  6. Avatar

    MirrorGirl

    I found this animation piece to be too literal, and therefore too clumsy. I would have worked more abstractly myself, told the story through inference (or not at all–it’s such a strange idea in the first place; not a bad idea, just one that’s better left to the imagination), perhaps using the shadow puppets she seems to be using for Lake Tahoe. It just doesn’t come off, in my opinion, and when the snow lover starts to melt it’s really grotesque, and the distorted reality of that intrudes upon what should be a more subtle process, an almost metaphorical thing: the perfect lover who inevitably slips away, leaving nothing but a chill in the air. At least that’s what I think.

    • Avatar

      Interesting view, but it’s Kate’s song and therefore her interpretation. We can all evaluate it, and say we would have created something different, that’s the easy part. but would it have been better? I’m not so sure, it would simply have been different. I do agree that the snowman melting is grotesque though. I have watched it once- I cannot bring myself to watch it again.

      • Avatar

        MirrorGirl

        If you can only watch it once, it’s a problem (I feel the same way). I can’t even count how many times I’ve watched the videos for Breathing or Running Up that Hill. Of course she can do what she wants, but I was a bit surprised to see such a literal interpretation, although now that I think of it, I was surprised at how literal and unimaginative her Deeper Understanding piece was, too. Not everyone is good at everything. I am a filmmaker and as such, contribute to my sound design and soundtracks, but am hardly a genius in the studio. For excellence in that area I rely on others. I think a filmmaker would have dealt with the basic idea of this very differently.

        • Avatar

          I have no artistic talents at all (something I would have loved to have been gifted with)…but I do see your point, it is a problem, and I do feel a bit silly saying that I’m unable to watch a animation simply because I find it rather disturbing. But it’s a fact. You are right in stating too, that her films/videos do tend to be quite literal. Oh well, this animation won’t be on my list; to watch on a regular basis.

  7. Avatar

    ReikiGlam

    I’ve never liked Kate’s videos…however, Wild Man and Misty animations are exactly what I’d want from her if I could dictate what she did! I don’t like artists in videos – I think it’s trite. I don’t want to see someone lip-syncing their song…I want to see a story or a mini-film. These animations REALLY hit the spot. I’m just so impressed with where Kate is at now in her career…it’s like everything has been rehearsal for this time in her life.

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